Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Rhubarb-Marionberry Jam


There they were, a bag of last summer’s marionberries tucked in the way back of my freezer. A happy discovery! I had been wandering aimlessly, wondering what to create with the slender stalks of crimson rhubarb on the kitchen counter, and those berries were just the spark of inspiration I needed – jam! 

And I’ve decided this will be my summer to start canning! ‘Til I begin that adventure, quick fridge jams will keep me contented. 


Imagining my new favorite jam, I eagerly mixed the rhubarb with my stash of marionberries. I first macerated some diced rhubarb in a mix of coconut sugar, honey, lemon juice and zest.  After that I simply plunked in the frozen berries and let it all simmer into a syrupy, luscious mass of jammy goodness. 


The contrasting flavors of tart rhubarb and sweet marionberries make for a brisk, vibrant jam with a vivid, jewel-toned color. A few spoonfuls swirled into thick yogurt elevated my breakfast staple into a luscious, rather pretty affair.  

If you have any frozen berries hiding out, this is a simple, pleasing jam to make with the season’s rhubarb. Or you can freeze (and hide) some rhubarb for jam-making later, when more fresh berries are available. Blue-barb jam anyone?


Rhubarb-Marionberry Jam
Makes just over 2 cups

1 pound rhubarb, cut into 1 inch dice 
1/4 cup coconut sugar
1/4 cup honey
Zest and juice of 1 large lemon
1 pound marionberries or blackberries (fresh or frozen, no need to defrost)

In a mixing bowl, combine the rhubarb, coconut sugar, honey, lemon juice and zest and let sit for about half an hour.  Scrape the mixture into a medium sized sauce pan and add the marionberries. Stir and bring it to a boil over medium high heat, then lower the heat a bit and let it cook while actively bubbling for 15 minutes. Stir a few times to make sure it isn’t sticking or scorching and lower the heat more if needed.  Test to see if it’s thickening by running a wooden spoon through the mixture. If it leaves a trail, it’s finished. Remove from the heat and let cool. Store the jam in a covered jar in the fridge. It will thicken more as it chills. It will keep for a couple of weeks. 


24 comments:

  1. Sounds delicious! I've got a rhubarb recipe coming up, soon, too. Gotta love that first "fruit" of the season!

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    1. Thanks, Brooke! Oh yum, rhubarb pie is the best. It is funny that we've come to see rhubarb as a fruit rather than a veg...whatever we call it, it's delicious! Hope you have a great long weekend!

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  2. I'd love some blu-barb jam, thank you! I sadly haven't seen a whole lot of rhubarb this season. Maybe I'll hunt it down this weekend and make a strawberry rhubarb crisp. This jam looks luscious Hannah!

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    1. Thank you, Beth! I hope you discover some rhubarb - a strawberry rhubarb crisp sounds divine. And now I'm craving some...when can I stop by? :)

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  3. Funny, I was thing blueberries and rhubarb but your name for that combo made me laugh...or maybe it made ME blue?

    I hadn't canned in years until I decided to do a few things last year; I had stopped myself from lack of equipment so I improvised with a cake cooling rack in my stockpot and made some jams and a cranberry apple butter that I should have quadrupled we loved it so much.

    Can't wait to hear about your canning adventures!

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    1. I like your creative improvising, Barb! Cranberry apple butter sounds amazing...you're inspiring me. I hope you a relaxing long weekend ahead (preferably with a couple of your St Croix Libres!) - I'm thinking of you.

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  4. My grandma (in Seattle) planted Marionberries a long time ago just for me. I wish we could get all these wonderful varieties out here! I recently bought coconut sugar for the first time, fun to see you using it too! AND I recently made jam from frozen berries for the first time recently--since I love raspberry jam but never have enough to make my own, this opens great new possibilities for me.

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    1. So sweet of your grandma, Sara! Marionberries are truly a Northwest specialty - so good. Come visit! I'm really enjoying coconut sugar and its earthier flavor. I should make some raspberry jam with frozen berries, too, since any that appear on my bushes disappear instantly. Have a great long weekend!

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  5. Replies
    1. Thank you so much! I'm happy you stopped by.

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  6. Yay canning! I have to get my hands on some rhubarb before it's gone--although I think I'll be going for the more traditional strawberry rhubarb jam. :)

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    1. Strawberry rhubarb is such a classic, delicious combo, Eileen - I love it! I hope you have a wonderful long weekend!

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  7. Hannah, I hadn't heard of marionberries before! Thanks for stopping by and joining the "jam" session. Cheers

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    1. Hi Carole, thank you for hosting! Marionberries are a marvelous Northwest blackberry and happily they grow like crazy. They're a terrific snacking and baking treat. Have a great weekend!

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  8. This jam looks really healthy and I'd love to put this on top of my daily bowl of yougurt! I'm not familiar with coconut sugar. I assume it has coconut fragrance to it. That sounds amazing! I'm new to Marionberries. I love learning about new food ingredients everyday from blogger friends! :)

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    1. Hi Nami, coconut sugar is made from the flower buds of the coconut tree and has a caramelized flavor similar to brown sugar. I really like using it for baking now, plus it has a lower glycemic level so it's a bit healthier than regular sugar. And marionberries are a lovely Northwest blackberry that we indulge in when they're in season (luckily they grow like crazy!). It is fun to learn from one another! My son made a bento box for his Japanese class this week and we went straight to your site for suggestions! Thank you again for all you share. Have a wonderful long weekend!

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  9. If you need some extra Pectin, let me know - I have a huge vat from last year that isn't opened!

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    1. Thank you, it sounds like you're a good canning resource, Alyssa! I may be calling on you for tips. Have a great weekend! :)

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  10. Canning is so much fun, isn't it? We haven't done any for ages, but are thinking about getting back into it. There's nothing like one's own jam and jellies! This looks terrific - thanks so much.

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    1. Thanks, John! You're right, making your own jam is just the best. I love capturing a bit of the season in a jar! I hope you're enjoying a lovely long weekend.

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  11. I love making jam but am not really proficient at preserving or canning, I am very happy to do the refrigerator type of canning and this will be on the agenda. I love that it's simple and straight forward. Every weekend I visit the farmers market hoping this is the week strawberries will appear, maybe this weekend!

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    1. I hope you found some strawberries, Suzanne, and are enjoying a wonderful long weekend! :)

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  12. I was wondering....could I substitute Mulberries for the Marionberries? This jam sounds wonderful! Lynn @ Turnips 2 Tangerines

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    1. Hi Lynn, I think mulberries would be a wonderful substitution! What a treat. I'm happy you stopped by!

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